Vistas: Geri Stengel’s Blog: Social entrepreneur

How Clear Values Can Strengthen Your Business

Thinking big, being bold, marketing and financial savvy: All these are required to make the leap from small business to high-growth business. But what keeps all these pieces together?

10 Social Media Habits To Boost Your Business

Yes, you can grow a business without damaging the planet or the people who live on it. From a start-up in 2006 to a presence in 30,000 stores worldwide, Yes To is a success story by any measure. And its values, as explained on its Facebook page, could come straight from “Social Enterprise 101,” if there were such a handbook:

  • a portion of all proceeds has been dedicated to a non-profit, 501(c)3 organization
  • sustainability in products,  partners, and the lives of the company and the people who work for the company
  • a team committed to taking steps to lead greener and more 'aware' lifestyles (organic fruit deliveries! recycling! team yoga!)
  • a healthy, happy team makes everything a little bit better

Just What Is a "Socialpreneur?"

It's the era of word creation: anything beginning with "i" as in iPhone or "e" as in e-marketing and, it seems, anything ending in "-preneur" as in solo-preneur.

But with no one standardizing definitions, the process has gotten out of hand; conglomerate words are taking on multiple meanings. Case in point: socialpreneur.  

When Bad Things Happen to Good Businesses

You can't plan for everything.

Like BP not putting in the right kind of plug on its oil well.

Kyle Berner saw a need and built a company that took into account sustainability, market, community benefit, biodegradability, fair trade, and ethics.

Vokashi: Fermenting Food Waste, Eliminating Garbage

Vandra Thorburn went into business for herself later in life – at 62 – motivated by both a cause and being laid off from her job. Necessity is the mother of invention!

Do Ethics Matter in Social Enterprise?

What is your definition of social entrepreneur? I've asked that question before but feel compelled to revisit in light of an article in the July 11 The New York Times.

Saving a City, One Entrepreneur at a Time

An interesting twist on public-private partnerships – and a social enterprise home run – is Bizdom U, a bootcamp for aspiring entrepreneurs in Detroit. It is funded by Dan Gilbert, a self-made man who has focused his philanthropy on one city and on building a network of small businesses to raise that city's economy. For four months, the would-be entrepreneurs receive a stipend while they work on business plans and refine their products and services. Some receive a $100,000 grant to implement the plan.

Entrepreneur Takes Recycling to New Level

If you think you've reduced your carbon footprint all you can, think again. By looking at the problem of landfills from two sides – not putting stuff in them and taking stuff out of them – a company founded in 2001 by then 19-year-old Tom Szaky has gone well beyond the blue recycling bins we all know and use (don't we?) to upcycling, the reuse of trash.

It all started with worms and a Princeton Business Plan contest.

Palestinian Entrepreneur Exemplifies Adage That Social Responsibility is Good for Business

"Social impact is our entrepreneurship goal and this is also serving us from a business standpoint."

Need I say more? That's a nice definition of social enterprise.

The statement above is from Nasser Abufarha, 46, founder of several social enterprises that serve both the farmers of Palestine and those who want to support organic and fair-trade enterprises. In fact, as indicated in the statement above, the growing demand for fair-trade and organic products is part of his business plan.

Bottom Billion is Major Market for Entrepreneurs Who Get It

If you wanted to design a product for the Indian market, where would you begin? Do you even know what products are needed? Do you know how to give your product value in the multi-faceted culture of the sub-continent? Do you know how much of that market has electricity, running water, or other infrastructure that might be needed in order to use your product?



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