Vistas: Geri Stengel’s Blog: Social Capital

4 Reasons Women Are More Responsible Entrepreneurs Than Men

Social responsibility is second nature to female entrepreneurs
When it comes to social responsibility the answer is “yes,” according to 2013 U.S. Trust Insights on Wealth and Worth. Successful women are more likely than successful men to own a business so they can pursue a personal passion and to make a positive impact on the world. These women are also far less likely than than their male counterparts to take actions such as moving the company to another state, eliminating staff or reducing employee benefits in response to increased tax burden.

Changing Investment Strategy Can Solve Problems, Generate Income

Ripples in the investment world are massing into a tidal wave of change in how we finance social good. It is a wave that will encompass investment brokers and philanthropists, venture capitalists and foundations.
 

Engaging Philanthropists and Opening New Channels and Sources of Growth Capital

It’s marketing 101: Emphasize the benefits to the consumers, not the benefit you gain by selling to them.

So, too, with philanthropists and high-net-worth individuals, according to panelists addressing Engaging Philanthropists and Opening New Channels and Sources of Growth Capital at the 2011 Social Impact Exchange’s Conference On Scaling Impact.

The Challenge Ahead: Unlocking Growth Capital for Nonprofits

Unlocking growth capital, now there’s a challenge, one addressed by a knowledgeable panel at the 2011 Social Impact Exchange’s Conference On Scaling Impact.

Foundations don’t invest enough for nonprofits to succeed, according to Kelly Fitzsimmons, chief program and strategy office for the Edna McConnell Clark Foundation. The missing links:

  • money to experiment and learn,
  • money for capacity-building.

It’s a point made at last year’s conference as well but one well worth repeating.

What’s the secret to scaling social impact? You tell me.

Is collaboration the secret ingredient to solving America’s social problems? If we’re going to create and grow a capital marketplace, one that scales proven models, the answer is a resounding “Yes!”

What’s the secret to scaling social impact? You tell me.

Is collaboration the secret ingredient to solving America’s social problems? If we’re going to create and grow a capital marketplace, one that scales proven models, the answer is a resounding “Yes!”

Doors Are Opening For Social Enterprises Seeking Funding, Support

Good grief! The future is already knocking on our door. Last October, I wrote about the need to find ways to make impact investment part of every portfolio. And I’ve been proselytizing for collaboration and networking since I started Ventureneer.

Impact Investors: A New Source of Funding for Social Entrepreneurs

Financial Ingenuity

Ingenious financial solutions to the world's social and environmental challenges are becoming a global force for change.

The microfinance movement started in the '70s in Bangladesh. By 2007, the microfinance industry provided $15 billion in microloans to 106 million of the world’s poorest families, according to the Microcredit Summit Campaign. The campaign was to reach 100 million of the world’s poorest families, especially the women of those families, with credit for self-employment and other financial and business services by the year 2005. That goal was very nearly reached and in November of 2006 the Campaign was extended to 2015 with two new goals: reach 175 million of the world's poorest people and ensure that 100 million families rise above earning $1 a day.

Social Investment Activism: It’s in the BHAG

 

 

As I mentioned last week, I was going to attend a Young Professionals Friendraiser for Fast Forward Fund (FFF), which I did. I enjoyed meeting new friends and catching up with the old gang. However, what impressed me the most were the presentations.



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